Bios

Peter Hoare

Peter is currently the Chemistry Outreach Officer in the School of Chemistry, Newcastle University, UK. He completed his BSc in Chemistry in 1984 and his PhD in Organic Fluorine Chemistry in 1989, both at Durham University, UK. He then completed a PGCE (school teacher training) at Newcastle University in 1989 and then embarked on a high school teaching career for 20 years at a successful and high attaining school in Northumberland.

Robert E. Belford

  I am an Associate Professor of Chemistry at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock with a focus on the use of computers in Chemical Education.  I am interested in how digital ICTs (Information and Communication Technologies) are changing the way our society shares and communicates information, and the impact this is having on chemical education and the practice of science.  I currently serve as Chair of the ACS Division of Chemical Education's (CHED) Committee on Computers in Chemical Education (CCCE), and see the Cheminformatics OLCC as an opportunity for the CCCE to contribute to the advancement of science by providing a mechanism for the integration of these new and evolving technologies into the chemistry curriculum.

Evan Hepler-Smith

Evan Hepler-Smith is a historian of science and technology. Currently, Evan is Ziff Environmental Fellow at the Harvard University Center for the Environment; he holds a Ph.D. in History of Science from Princeton University. Evan studies the history of chemical information from the 19th century through the present day. His research shows, first, that debates over chemical nomenclature, notation, and information management have been central to the intellectual and institutional development of global chemistry. Second, he shows that century-old approaches to chemical information have shaped how digital chemical information is handled today. He is excited to bring this historical perspective to the OLCC collaboration.

Stuart Chalk

I am an Associate Professor Chemistry trained as an analytical chemist with expertise in flow analysis methodology and instrumentation.  Over the last 15 years I have morphed into a cheminformatician working on research projects to develop data standards (e.g. the Analytical Information Markup Language - AnIML, Common Standard for eXchange – CSX, Experiment Markup Language - ExptML), electronic laboratory notebooks (e.g. the Eureka Research Workbench), scientific ontologies (e.g. the Chemical Analysis Ontology – CAO), and scientific data representation.  My current projects include: REST API development for NIST-IUPAC solubility datasets, chemical property data extraction and annotation from PDF files, scientific data framework (SciDF) development, and the Chemical Analysis Metadata Platform (ChAMP).  I have expertise in XML and Markup Languages, XSLT/XPATH/SVG, RDF, JSON/JSON-LD, PHP, Javascript, MySQL, SPARQL, CSS, CMS’s, REST interfaces, API design and construction, schema design, ontology development and Fedora-Commons.

Nathan Brown

Nathan BrownNathan Brown is the Head of the in silico Medicinal Chemistry group in the Cancer Therapeutics Unit at The Institute of Cancer Research in London (UK). At the ICR, Nathan and his group support our entire drug discovery portfolio together with developing new computational methodologies to enhance our drug design work. Nathan conducted his doctoral research in Sheffield with Professor Peter Willett focusing on evolutionary algorithms and graph theory. After a two–year Marie Curie fellowship in Amsterdam in collaboration with Professor Johann Gasteiger in Erlangen, he joined the Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research in Basel for a three–year Presidential fellowship in Basel working with Professors Peter Willett and Karl–Heinz Altmann. Nathan's work has led to the pioneering work on mulitobjective de novo design in addition to a variety of discoveries and method development in bioisosteric identification and replacement, scaffold hopping, molecular descriptors and statistical modelling. Nathan continues to pursue his research in all aspects of in silico medicinal chemistry. Nathan recent published the first book on bioisosteres, entitled Bioisosteres in Medicinal Chemistry.