Bios

Robert E. Belford

  I am an Associate Professor of Chemistry at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock with a focus on the use of computers in Chemical Education.  I am interested in how digital ICTs (Information and Communication Technologies) are changing the way our society shares and communicates information, and the impact this is having on chemical education and the practice of science.  I currently serve as Chair of the ACS Division of Chemical Education's (CHED) Committee on Computers in Chemical Education (CCCE), and see the Cheminformatics OLCC as an opportunity for the CCCE to contribute to the advancement of science by providing a mechanism for the integration of these new and evolving technologies into the chemistry curriculum.

Sunghwan Kim

Sunghwan Kim is a Staff Scientist at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), National Library of Medicine (NLM), National Institutes of Health (NIH).  As a computational chemist and cheminformatician, he is actively involved in the PubChem project, which develops and maintains a small-molecule database called PubChem.  Specifically, his research has been focused on building and improving “PubChem3D”, which is PubChem’s chemical information resource derived from 3-dimensional (3-D) molecular structures.  He holds a M.Sc. in Inorganic Chemistry (from Hanyang University, South Korea) and a Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry (from the University of Georgia at Athens).

Evan Hepler-Smith

Evan Hepler-Smith is a historian of science and technology. Currently, Evan is Ziff Environmental Fellow at the Harvard University Center for the Environment; he holds a Ph.D. in History of Science from Princeton University. Evan studies the history of chemical information from the 19th century through the present day. His research shows, first, that debates over chemical nomenclature, notation, and information management have been central to the intellectual and institutional development of global chemistry. Second, he shows that century-old approaches to chemical information have shaped how digital chemical information is handled today. He is excited to bring this historical perspective to the OLCC collaboration.

Steve Heller

I have been involved in chemical databases and chemical information since the early 1970's. From the NIH/EPA/NIST mass spectral database to the NIH/EPA Chemical Information System (CIS) to the Open Source IUPAC International Chemical Identifier (InChI) I have seen the explosion of electronic information.  This vast explosion of electronic information, coupled with the Internet has created the opportunity to connect these many, many silos and islands of data and information. Since what we are looking to access, analyze and understand is associated with  a chemical, the ability of the InChI chemical identifier linking these sources is critical to progress. I am currently the Project Director of the InChI Trust, a non-profit UK charity that is responsible for the support and expansion of the Open Source InChI algorithm.  Leaning the skills to find information and data is critical to all those students in chemistry. That is why I am so enthusiastic about being involved in this online intercollegiate course in Cheminformatics/Chemical Information Sciences.

Nathan Brown

Nathan BrownNathan Brown is the Head of the in silico Medicinal Chemistry group in the Cancer Therapeutics Unit at The Institute of Cancer Research in London (UK). At the ICR, Nathan and his group support our entire drug discovery portfolio together with developing new computational methodologies to enhance our drug design work. Nathan conducted his doctoral research in Sheffield with Professor Peter Willett focusing on evolutionary algorithms and graph theory. After a two–year Marie Curie fellowship in Amsterdam in collaboration with Professor Johann Gasteiger in Erlangen, he joined the Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research in Basel for a three–year Presidential fellowship in Basel working with Professors Peter Willett and Karl–Heinz Altmann. Nathan's work has led to the pioneering work on mulitobjective de novo design in addition to a variety of discoveries and method development in bioisosteric identification and replacement, scaffold hopping, molecular descriptors and statistical modelling. Nathan continues to pursue his research in all aspects of in silico medicinal chemistry. Nathan recent published the first book on bioisosteres, entitled Bioisosteres in Medicinal Chemistry.