Bios

Evan Hepler-Smith

Evan Hepler-Smith is a historian of science and technology. Currently, Evan is Ziff Environmental Fellow at the Harvard University Center for the Environment; he holds a Ph.D. in History of Science from Princeton University. Evan studies the history of chemical information from the 19th century through the present day. His research shows, first, that debates over chemical nomenclature, notation, and information management have been central to the intellectual and institutional development of global chemistry. Second, he shows that century-old approaches to chemical information have shaped how digital chemical information is handled today. He is excited to bring this historical perspective to the OLCC collaboration.

Abhik Seal

I am a PHD (Chemical Informatics ) student at Indiana University Bloomington working with Prof David Wild  at the chemgenomics and cheminformatics lab .Before joining here I was a Banker at State Bank of India.

Jordi Cuadros

Jordi Cuadros is an Associate Professor at IQS Universitat Ramon Llull (Barcelona, Spain) where he teaches introductory courses of programming to students in Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Industrial Engineering and Biotechnology degrees. He holds a PhD in chemistry and a second degree in Education and his research expands over the intersection between physical sciences, computers, education and data analytics. He has been involved in developing simulations for learning chemistry and physics and currently tries to place some light on the learning that takes place when students use interactive and open-ended applications.

Steve Heller

I have been involved in chemical databases and chemical information since the early 1970's. From the NIH/EPA/NIST mass spectral database to the NIH/EPA Chemical Information System (CIS) to the Open Source IUPAC International Chemical Identifier (InChI) I have seen the explosion of electronic information.  This vast explosion of electronic information, coupled with the Internet has created the opportunity to connect these many, many silos and islands of data and information. Since what we are looking to access, analyze and understand is associated with  a chemical, the ability of the InChI chemical identifier linking these sources is critical to progress. I am currently the Project Director of the InChI Trust, a non-profit UK charity that is responsible for the support and expansion of the Open Source InChI algorithm.  Leaning the skills to find information and data is critical to all those students in chemistry. That is why I am so enthusiastic about being involved in this online intercollegiate course in Cheminformatics/Chemical Information Sciences.

Leah McEwen

Leah McEwen is the Programmatic Coordinator for the Edna McConnell Clark Physical Sciences eLibrary and the Chemistry Librarian at Cornell University.  Her background is in biochemistry and library science and she is responsible for library resources and specialized services supporting chemistry in all fields and science and technology studies at Cornell.  She has contributed to and served in advisory capacity for a number of information resources including the ACS Style Guide, the ACS CPT Guidelines for Bachelor’s Degree Programs, Cornell’s VIVO, and CAS’ SciFinder.  She is an active member of the Chemical Information Division of the American Chemical Society, most recently as Secretary as well as Program Chair, addressing a wide range of topical interests from open access to advanced training and education to intellectual property and licensing to data- and text-mining.  She is also a member of the ACS Joint Board-Council Committee on Publications, the adjoining Subcommittee on Copyright and the Chemical & Engineering News Editorial Board.